CoastWatch Photographer Reports Status Mile 315

Crescent Beach Sea Stacks - Oregon by CoastWatch

CoastWatch Crescent Beach, Oregon and Sea Stacks

Last year I joined the

Oregon Shores CoastWatch

program and adopted Mile 315.  I am volunteering my photography skills and time to report on the mile between Ecola State Park and North Chapman Beach which is just north of Cannon Beach. I adopted the mile in order to get to know the coast more intimately, enjoy some recreation by hiking and being outdoors, and to help protect the Oregon coastline. I’m not a “tree hugger” necessarily, but this is a good cause and fulfills my need to participate in something outside my “normal”.

This is an interesting part of the ocean’s edge for many reasons but one of my favorites is the deactivated lighthouse,

Tillamook Rock Light

just a few miles out in the water. Below are the Wikipedia details with lots of links for more information.

“Tillamook Rock Light is a deactivated lighthouse on the Oregon Coast of the United States. It is located approximately 1.2 miles (1.9 km) offshore from Tillamook Head, and 20 miles (32 km) south of the Columbia River, situated on less than an acre of basalt rock in the Pacific Ocean. The construction of the lighthouse was commissioned in 1878 by the United States Congress, and began in 1880. The construction took more than 500 days to finish, with its completion in January 1881. In early January 1881, when the lighthouse was near completion, the barque Lupatia was wrecked near the rock during inclement weather and sank, killing all 16 crew members.

The Light was officially lit on January 21, 1881. At the time, it was the most expensive West Coast lighthouse ever built. Due to the erratic weather conditions, and the dangerous commute for both keepers and suppliers, the lighthouse was nicknamed “Terrible Tilly” (or Tillie). Over the years, storms have damaged the lighthouse, shattered the lens, and eroded the rock. It was decommissioned in 1957, and has since been sold to private owners. Until its license was revoked in 1999, it functioned as a columbarium, and today remains privately owned. The light is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and is part of the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge. It is visible from the coastal cities of Seaside, Cannon Beach, as well as from Ecola State Park.”

Read my report and see the latest photo essay. Mile 315 Report – Oregon Shores/CoastWatch