OC photographer interviewed in Shutterbug

OC Photographer,

Julie Diebolt Price, was interviewed for the Business Trends article May 2018 issue of Shutterbug magazine. Business Trends writer, Maria Piscopo, presented this startling fact. There are

32,527,830 #travelphotography posts on Instagram.

Maria’s interview with four professional photographers discussed finding success in the changing marketplace of the travel and landscape photography business.

OC Photographer in May 2018 Shutterbug - Carizzo Plain Central California

Wild flowers on the Carizzo Plain

Click here for the Shutterbug online magazine.

Click here to read the article in the May 2018 edition. Here are some excepts from my interview…

Almost all of my marketing is concentrated online. I have a one-page glossy handout detailing my bylines and career highlights for the travel industry. I, of course, have updated business cards directing the viewer to my websites and expertise. Other than that, I produce electronic newsletters, blog posts, and try to keep up with social media. The best part of this is that they can be updated as soon as skills change and you aren’t stuck with out-of-date printed materials.

In my studio and at Santiago Canyon College/Community Services, I teach a course “How to Start a Business in 5 Easy Steps”. I mentor new business owners with a specialty in photography.

Let me know if you have any questions about photography, tours, and experiences – email me at julie@jdptravels.com.

 

Getting All My Ducks in a Row

All My Ducks in a Row

We got all our ducks in a row at Oxbow Regional Park in

Gresham, Oregon

Ducks and an easy hike awaits you just 7 miles east of Gresham, Oregon at Oxbow Regional Park. Using a National Forest Pass or paying a $5.00 day use fee affords easy access to the whitewater of the Sandy River, well marked hiking trails, picnic areas and campsites.

Riverbank restoration in process

The riverbank is under restoration because the river has undercut a wide path as it forms the oxbow curves. The exposed stumps on the shoreline have been carbon dated to 1780. At that time an eruption of Mt. Hood, a stratovolcano and now the highest mountain peak in Oregon, caused a mudflow to completely bury the forest.

The buzz of chain saws accompanied us on our “hike” until we rounded a bend and the trees muffled the sound. We learned that the Forest Service was grooming the tributary for salmon breeding by creating pools of still water with downed logs.

You only need a mild interest in spending time outdoors either walking in the forest, or hiking, or camping, or simply communing with nature to enjoy Oxbow Regional Park. But, for someone like me who has seemingly found a new lease on the outdoor life, this park is a jewel in the crown of the Mt. Hood National Forest.

NOTE:

Actually, the “duck” photo above is a family of Canadian Geese – adults and adolescents. But, you already knew that, if you’ve read this far, so there is no need to correct my “mistake”.