Portland Pedicab Tour

Portland Pedicab tour in OregonThe most fun way to experience a brewery tour in Portland, Oregon, is to be pedaled from brewery to brewery by a young and nubile rider. This is an eco-friendly transportation and marketing alternative.

I found out about this PDX Pedicab tour through Groupon, where I purchased the deal for a tour group that I was leading on one of our Pacific Northwest tours last fall. Here is their website link.

Imagine enjoying fresh air and city sites from your cab while touring a number of (well…three) local distilleries and sampling their brews. You also learn the history of their brewery and their spirits.

As you may know, Portland has become a world-renowned center for microbreweries and the unofficial beer capital of the U.S. with more breweries than any other city in the country – 32 within the city limits and 38 if you count the entire metropolitan area. With a renaissance of craft-brewing in Portland since the 1980’s, it has been called “Beervana” and “Munich on the Williamette”.

Don’t forget to tip your rider. They live on tips, which are not included in the price of your tour. They work hard for your enjoyment!

Mt. Hood Reflected in Trillium Lake Oregon

Reflection of Mt. Hood in Trillium Lake, Cascade Range, Oregon

Mt. Hood Reflected in Trillium Lake, Oregon

Fall in the Pacific Northwest can offer incredible scenic opportunities. In October last year we drove around the base of Mt. Hood to Trillium Lake and I was able to capture this image with my iPhone 4S.

Trillium Lake (man made) is located about seven miles south-southwest of Mt. Hood. It is formed by a dam at the headwaters of Mud Creek which is a tributary to the Salmon River. It was created in 1960 by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The area was part of Barlow Road which was a segment of the Oregon Trail. Trillium is a flower particularly noticeable here.

Mt. Hood, in the Cascade Range, is located about 50 miles east-southeast of Portland and is Oregon’s highest mountain at 11,249 feet and the peak is home to twelve glaciers. While Mt. Hood is considered potentially active, an eruption is unlikely, so is informally considered dormant.

It is a popular hiking destination, as well as skiing (sometimes into July) and climbing. More than 130 people have died in climbing-related accidents since records have been kept. It seems that someone always loses their life during the winter months on the mountain.

We travel here a lot and I have conducted of tours in this Pacific Northwest area. I call this the Oregon Bounty Tour and offer this program twice per year.

Cape Blanco Lighthouse Oregon Coast

Cape Blanco Lighthouse, Oregon Coast, in black and white

Cape Blanco Lighthouse, Oregon Coast

On a West Coast lighthouse pilgrimage in 2009 I visited the lighthouse at Port Orford, Oregon. It is the southernmost of Oregon’s lighthouses, perched on the light cliffs that give its name. It is also the oldest original tower in Oregon and stands at 59 feet. The light was lit for the first time on December 20, 1870.

Cape Blanco Lighthouse is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Oregon’s most westerly, oldest continuously operating light and highest focal plane above the sea. A two-family dwelling was built for keepers’ quarters with fireplaces in each room for heat. The construction materials were shipped in with the exception of the bricks, which were made locally. A photo of the bricks, captured for use as textures, will follow in a later post.

Augustin Jean Fresnel

Pronounced (Freh-nel), A.J. Fresnel made the greatest stride in lighthouse technology when he invented his optic system. Fresnel’s system used prisms to focus the light lost above and below the light source, back into a single beam of light. The light is focused through the center of the lens (drum panel or bulls eye) creating a highly visible beam of light. (Source T. Hewitt, http://www.portorfordoregon.com/blanco.html)

This was actually my second visit to these restricted Coast Guard grounds near Cape Blanco State Park. The first time I was there the fog was so thick it was impossible to see even a few feet in front of my face. The drive out to the lighthouse can be a little treacherous and we certainly weren’t going to take any undue risks.