Use of Royalty-Free Photos, Video and Audio

Royalty-free photos, video, audioRoyalty-free music, audio, video and photo files are an integral part of hybrid photography.

Hybrid photography is a combination of still photos, video, and audio (music, sound effects, or the spoken word). It is critical when using any sound and photos/video, that one has the rights to use them. Thus, today’s topic of Roalty-Free.

Photographers today earn their living by selling the rights to their images. Whether it is a portrait print (not to be scanned and distributed) or a digital file, a user must have permission and rights to use the image before it can be used. Stock agencies have excellent systems set up to make royalty-free purchases online. You can buy rights to photos, videos, illustrations, etc. I am listed with several stock agencies – iStock, Dreamstime, Alamy, and several others. Royalty-free music and sound effects are also offered by online agencies. My favorite is Premium Beat.

Be sure to download and read the royalty-free rights you are purchasing. Keep the documents in a handy place because you may need it to prove your rights to use the digital files. For example, on several occasions with YouTube recently, my rights to use music have been challenged. When I can easily go back to the royalty-free release, copy and paste the important information to defend the dispute on YouTube, that makes life easier.

This week I was challenged again on some Chinese music that I purchased in 2009. There were three copyright holders on the music. Two have released the music for me to use, one did not. Rather than spend significant research time and effort locating the purchase document, I chose to take the hybrid photography project off YouTube, made it a simple video with no sound, and re-uploaded it to YouTube. I don’t know if this little project is worth any more effort, so I may just let it go now, and be more diligent on future projects.

Here’s a link to The Tao of Tea SILENT.

Julie Diebolt Price earns Photographic Craftsman degree

Julie Diebolt Price, Cr.P.

Julie Diebolt Price, Cr.P.

Local Photographer Earns Craftsman Degree

Tustin, April 2014—Julie Diebolt Price of JDP Photography in Tustin has earned the Photographic Craftsman degree from Professional Photographers of America (PPA). The degree was presented by PPA at the association’s annual convention, Imaging USA, held in Phoenix, Arizona.

In being recognized for helping advance education and moving the photography industry forward, this degree is not merely a piece of paper. It means that Diebolt Price has met the standards of excellence set by PPA. She has been awarded the Photographic Craftsman degree in recognition of her service to the photographic profession as an orator, author and mentor.

Diebolt Price’s degree—and all the expertise it requires—illustrates her accomplishments and talent as one of a select few.

JDP Photography specializes in business photography serving Southern California by creating executive portraits as well as images for websites and brochures. Photography services are available for both individuals and teams.

Diebolt Price teaches photography classes locally in the Tustin studio and at Santiago Canyon College/Community Services, and nationally and internationally for workshops and photographic journeys.

About PPA

Professional Photographers of America (PPA) is the largest international non-profit association created by professional photographers, for professional photographers. Almost as long-lived as photography itself, PPA has roots that date back to 1869. It assists close to 27,000 members through protection, education and resources for their continued success. See how PPA helps photographers be more at ppa.com.

Capturing Fireworks at Disneyland

Fireworks at Disneyland

Capturing fireworks images at Disneyland in Anaheim, California was the highlight of our spring Novice field session. We didn’t have to pay admission to Disneyland to get the best view of the fireworks. You can park in the Downtown Disney parking lot which is free for three hours and walk to the Mickey & Friends Parking Structure. Because of spring break the park and surrounding area was packed with visitors. So, I opted to pay $16.00 to park in the structure.

We had the best view from the top level.

You can see what I came home with at this link: http://youtu.be/HZO9kXwLpqA

You can join me at the next Novice Photographer class at Santiago Canyon College/Community Services this summer.

Crossing the Orange Curtain to visit Pink’s

Pink's at Melrose and La Brea, Los Angeles, Orange County

Today’s post isn’t really about colors. It is about crossing borders and eating hot dogs.

On a sunshiny Saturday morning we set out for Los Angeles. We live in Orange County, California, which has a very different culture from Los Angeles. While our destination was only 40 miles away, it might as well have been across the country.

The freeway traffic was light as we ventured north on the 5 Freeway. When we got to the border of Orange County and Los Angeles County, we came to an abrupt stop and suffered stop-and-go traffic all the way into L.A. While it is usually expected during weekday rush hour traffic, it was extremely frustrating to spend two hours on a Saturday morning in gridlock.

You are probably wondering why we went on this serendipitous adventure to the corner of Melrose and La Brea, just down the street from Paramount Pictures. This past week we saw a re-run of Huell Howser’s, California Gold program. On that segment he visited a Hollywood legend since 1939, Pink’s – famous for chili dogs for 74 years. He delivered such a powerful message we decided we just had to see this legend and taste their hot dogs.

Love Dogs??? Think Pink's

“History of Pink’s Famous Chili Dogs

Pink’s is probably the most famous hot dog stand in the country…certainly in Los Angeles! It has been in the same location for 74 years. It is not unusual to see a Rolls Royce pull up to Pink’s (the chili dog ordered will be for the occupant, not the chauffeur). Movie stars, well-known dignitaries, struggling musicians, businessmen, housewives, school children…all have savored Pink’s Famous Chili Dogs.

Paul & Betty Pink started their hot dog stand in 1939. It was only a large-wheeled pushcart in those days. The depression was on and money was scarce. Pink’s Chili Dogs, complete with a large warm bun, oversized hot dog, mustard, onions and thick chili sold for 10 cents each. His hot dog wagon was located in “the country” among the weeds, rolling hills and open spaces…that was the corner of La Brea and Melrose 74 years ago!

Times have changed, but not at Pink’s. In 1946 Paul & Betty traded in their hot dog wagon for a small building (constructed on the very same spot where the wagon had stood). But the stand hasn’t changed since those days. Pink’s still gives that very same quality and quantity…mouth-watering chili, generously topping an all-beef hot dog with mustard and onions. Pink’s now offers over 30 varieties of hot dogs and 12 combinations of hamburgers. Pink’s has not only survived for 74 years, but has become famous. Pink’s Hot Dog stand is a quick lunch, a nostalgic trip into the past, and a delicious experience. It is definitely a landmark in Hollywood.”

Pink's Est. 1939

We did enjoy our hot dogs, onion rings, and root beer. Would we do it again (two hours driving in L.A. traffic – not counting the return trip)? – no!

Imagine our chagrin when we read on the menu that they have several other locations – one being in Orange County at Knott’s Berry Farm!

***

Source:  Pink’s, A Hollywood Legend since 1939, www.pinkshollywood.com

Texas State Highway 165

Texas State Highway 165On a recent visit to Austin, Texas, we drove along the shortest main state highway in Texas, Texas State Highway 165. It is only 0.51 miles long and is partially locked at night. It isn’t connected to any other Texas highway system roads and has a posted 10 miles per hour speed limit.

This historic road, running through the Texas State Cemetery, was established in 1932. It is just blocks east of the State Capitol and is the final resting place of legendary Texans who have made the state what it is today. The cemetery was established in 1851 and serves as a tribute to the many people who have made Texas famous throughout the world.

The most interesting feature of this cemetery (in my opinion) is that Antonio Briones, a Union veteran in the Civil War, is buried on a hill away from the entire population…it was not a good thing to be a Union soldier in Texas during the Civil War.